Lucas Generator A900R L3


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oljunkman
Newbie

Joined: 20/11/2013
Location: Australia
Posts: 6
Posted: 02:39am 12 Feb 2020      

Hi guys, as regards the Lucas a900 generator as used on the Hannan's Freelite, I'm not sure what info you require but can tell you what I know. I worked in what used to be the Freelite Dept. at Hannan Bros. up until 1974 when we repaired Lucas starters and generators as exchange units there. There was still heaps of Freelite stuff still lying around and as it was my Grandfather, Les Hannan who developed them, I wanted one as a keepsake. In those days there was only two people left in the place who knew anything about them, one being my father Ray Hannan. I was told that the generator used on the Freelite was an A900 with the field coils rewound at Hannan Bros. There was no voltage regulator, only a standard cutout as used on early motorcycles and cars. Once the generator voltage exceeded battery voltage the cutout would click in and the batteries would charge. The Lucas house lighting batteries were about 70cm tall by 20cm square and were single cell 2v. each. When you purchased a Freelite it came with a small panel which housed an ammeter, fuse, and the cutout which would be mounted close to the batteries. There was nothing to stop the batteries overcharging so you needed to keep an eye on them in case they boiled and the electrolyte level dropped down too far. I used one of those generators as a fast charger on my boat which was a 24v system. The generator was a 32v and I used a diode from a truck instead of the original cutout so it did'nt matter whether you were charging a 12v or 24v system, as soon as the gen voltage was higher than the batt. voltage, the diode would connect the two. Anyway, I found enough parts to build myself a Freelite which was the last one to come out of Hannan Bros. When the place was sold in 1974 I took home anything that looked like a Freelite part and still have some stuff left. My Dad told me that my Grandfather and his mate Richard "Dicky" Dickson spent years testing the Freelites and the last models, post war, were very reliable and big sellers.